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Aortic Thrombus

 Veterinary Secrets Revealed! Newsletter

One unfortunately VERY COMMON condition affecting
cats is called Aortic Thrombo-emboli. This equates
to a person having a stroke, but in this case, the
blood clot forms in the large artery of a cat, called
the aorta.

The presentation of a caudal aortic thrombus (saddle thrombus)
is common. These cats present with an acute onset of rear limb
dysfunction. The foot pads and nail beds are blue. There is no
palpable femoral pulse. While recognition of this condition is
straightforward, management can be difficult.

Ninety percent of the time, a feline saddle thrombus occurs
secondary to severe heart disease. If the cat survives the first
episode, there is great risk of future clot formation. The cat
may have any form of cardiomyopathy (restrictive, hypertrophic,
dilated, hyperthyroid). Feline cardiomyopathies typically cause
diastolic dysfunction due to development of a stiff left ventricle.
Cats develop left atrial enlargement secondary to restricted
ventricular filling. When this occurs, stagnant blood flow and
endothelial damage within the left atrium can activate the clotting
system. Most frequently, the clot forms within the atrium. A piece
of this clot can break off and float out the aorta to lodge in any
artery. The most common site for embolization is the caudal aorta.

Other locations include the renal arteries, the cerebral artery,the brachial artery, the thoracic aorta, the cranial abdominal aorta, the mesenteric artery, and the coronary arteries. When a clot lodges in a cerebral artery, seizures may occur. Renal infarction causes acute renal failure.

Surgical and medical therapies have been attempted to manage saddle thrombi. Cats usually do not live through surgery because of theirunderlying heart disease and reperfusion injury. Prior to surgery,nuclear imaging or angiography is required to locate the clot.Aggressive thrombolytic agents have been utilized. Streptokinase appearsto be toxic to cats. Tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) will dissolve the clots, but the cats often die from hyperkalemia and reperfusion toxicity. One cardiologist claims that with conservative therapy (heparin), 50% of his patients regain use of their limbs.

SO What can you do??

First treat any underlying condition that could per-dispose your cat to this.

Second if this has happened, then you can give conventional AND Natural medications to decrease the liklehood of a secondary stroke.

Conventional medications involve low dose aspirin therapy.

Alternative options include a few COMMON herbs.

1. Willow Bark is a natural source of salciylates ( the active
ingredient of aspirin)

2. Gink Bilboa..is primarily used to stimulate brain function, but
it is ALSO an excellent anti-clotting herb.

//////////////////////////////////////////////    

P.S. MANY, MANY, MANY of you have ASKED about getting a Hard Copy Version of Veterinary Secrets Revealed..and guess what? It will be available shortly in time for the Holidays.

I am printing a limited quantity, so if you are interested,
pay close attention to the newsletter in the next few days.

You can also send a note to my brother/webmaster/partner in crime Michael saying you want to be on the Priority Notification List.
It’s Your Pet. Heal Them At Home!

Best Wishes,

Dr Andrew Jones, DVM
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Copyright 2007 Veterinary Sec.rets Revealed

Tel: 1-800-396-1534
Fax: 1-250-352-1901
http://www.veterinarysecretsrevealed.com/ebook/
support@veterinarysecretsrevealed.com

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December 5, 2007 - Posted by | Feline Health

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